Our Team


Our writers are journalists, scientists, educators, engineers and journalists. Some are independent consultants, others have full time jobs and still others are stay at home parents with professional backgrounds. We have Americans, Brits and Canadians on the team. We pride ourselves on being able to write intelligently on technical and highly specialised topics.

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D. Miller

building design and construction, renewable energy, law, food and drink, style, business, training and education
dee@quillandcompass.co.uk

Education: B.S. Architecture, M.Eng.
Professional Experience:

  • technical and policy writing and editing
  • building codes and standards
  • green building
  • renewable energy
  • building design
  • structural design
  • building evaluation
  • process design
  • Educator: green building, engineering law, blueprint reading

Can also write on:

  • food and drink
  • DIY
  • music, art, theatre
  • fitness
  • law
  • etc.

posts: thousands
Has lived in: the US (midwest), Canada, Scotland
Title: Principal, editor, writer.
Excerpt 1 (technical - Canada):
from "Definition of Green Roofs"
The term “green roof” sometimes refers to types of roofs, such as light colored single ply membranes, that reduce energy costs or have other environmental benefits. However, for this chapter we will define green roofs as roofs where organic plantings are cultivated and appropriate systems for insulation and moisture control are provided. Green roofs are also sometimes referred to as “eco-roofs,” “living roofs” or “roof gardens.”
Green roofs benefit the urban environment in many ways, but in most cities, the principal benefit is either a reduction in storm water runoff or a reduction in the urban heat island effect. Since green roofs can reduce costs to municipalities through storm water regulation and improvement in air quality, they may qualify for tax credits or other special considerations. Green roofs are a rarity today, but in the future, they will be much more common in North American cities.
Excerpt 2 (general-Australia):
from "Four Ways To Relax During Your Move"
Moving house should be a bright, optimistic time. You’re making a new start in a new place and it’s an opportunity to put everything into order, explore a new neighbourhood and make a new home your own. However, moves can be backward-looking instead of forward-looking, full of stress and anxiety.
It’s not too difficult to create the good kind of move, though. Start by hiring (our client). Our competent, friendly staff can turn almost any move into a positive experience, but there are a few things that you can do to help, too. When it comes to these four things, nobody but you can clear the way for a low-stress move.

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D. Miller

D. Miller

building design and construction, renewable energy, law, food and drink, style, business, training and education

L. Moodie

media, marketing, hospitality industry, kids and family, decorating, style and fashion

Education: M.A. History
Professional Experience:

  • Media
  • Marketing
  • Publishing
  • Hospitality industry

Can also write on:

  • DIY
  • Preservation
  • Volunteerism and civic engagement
  • Kids and family
  • Decorating, style and fashion
  • Food and drink
  • etc.

Posts: hundreds
Has lived in: England and Scotland
Title: Writer, editor
Excerpt 1 (technical - Australian market):
from "Hunter’s Wellies in the Line of Fire"
During WWII, Hunter were called on to produce boots for the British Army once more, as well as ground sheets, life belts and pretty much anything else you can think of that's made from rubber. The boots produced for the Army were the style now labeled as Argyll, a general purpose, loose-fitting boot in basic black. However, once the war was over, the company looked to expand its market beyond the boundaries of Britain, its Army and the labourers who most appreciated their qualities. Hunter wellies were restyled to fit better, produced in a new colour choice (Army green) and rapidly became popular among the landed gentry. This original boot is the most popular Hunter style and has been reworked for the twenty first century in various patterns, colours and gloss finishes.
Excerpt 2 (general-Australian market):
from "Three Top Tips For Throwing Food (by baby Kester)"
Crucial to food-throwing success is technique. First of all, you can’t just grab and go. Top priority should be given to preparing the material before launch. Ideally, any munchy missile should be mashed up to form a soft and sticky ball when thrown. On some occasions, you may be fortunate enough to see such items explode satisfyingly on impact. Best results are generally afforded by chewing food slightly (be careful not to swallow, particularly if vegetables are involved), spitting it out into your hand or bib, transferring it from palm to palm and then throwing.

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L. Moodie

L. Moodie

media, marketing, hospitality industry, kids and family, decorating, style and fashion

M. Karfunkle

software development, physics, chemistry, automotive, travel, food and drink, music and dance

Education: B.S. Physics and Chemistry
Professional Experience: 

  • Software developer
  • Museum exhibit designer
  • Researcher

Can also write on:

  • Food and drink
  • Music and dance
  • Automotive
  • Travel

Posts: hundreds
Has lived in: US, Scotland, Singapore, Russia
Title: Writer, editor
Excerpt 1 (technical - Australian market):
from "How Mercedes-Benz Pioneered Car Safety”
Since its inception, Mercedes-Benz has been at the forefront of car safety. Many of the safety features and principles that we consider standard in all cars today were first put into use in Mercedes-Benz vehicles. In fact, Carl Benz solved one of the first safety-related problems in automotive history: how to steer two wheels on one axle. His double-pivot steering mechanism uses a kingpin on the inside of each wheel, allowing them to pivot to the left and right while the axle itself remains stationary. Double-pivot steering replaced the first cars’ “turntable” steering mechanism that simply turned the whole axle about its centre, a much clumsier and less responsive mechanism that couldn’t respond with much agility at all. Even though the double-pivot is over 120 years old, it’s still how cars are steered today.
Excerpt 2 (general- Australian market):
from "Looking Forward To the US Masters"
We hardly need to tell you that the Masters Tournament is one of the year’s four most important golf tournaments. If you’re not already looking forward to the US Masters, there are some good reasons to get excited. This year, four Australian players will attend the tournament: Jason Day, Oliver Goss, Marc Leishman, and last year’s winner, the first Australian to win the Masters, Adam Scott. In fact, Australia is only out-represented by three nations in the 2014 Masters: the United States, the UK and South Africa. While we do not yet know the full roster of players for the 2015 tournament, we will most likely see Adam Scott return due to his past Masters win, and hopefully a record total number of Australian golfers.

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M. Karfunkle

M. Karfunkle

software development, physics, chemistry, automotive, travel, food and drink, music and dance

C. Hirsch

education, training, exams and testing, print design, fashion, literature

Education: M.Education B.A. Language, Literature, and Writing
Professional Experience: 

  • Educational testing
  • Special education
  • Management in education
  • Social justice

Can also write on:

  • Literature
  • Fashion
  • Design
  • Food and drink
  • Lifestyle
  • etc.

Posts: hundreds
Has lived in: the US, Denmark
Title: Writer, editor

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C. Hirsch

C. Hirsch

education, training, exams and testing, print design, fashion, literature

E. Topinka

marketing, news reporting, travel, sports, literature, parenting, cooking, home and DIY

Education: B.A., Journalism and Spanish
Professional Experience:

  • Marketing professional
  • Reporter and news assistant (large regional newspaper)

Can also write on:

  • travel
  • cooking
  • reading
  • sports
  • parenting
  • Home and DIY

Languages: English, Spanish
Posts: dozens
Has lived in: US
Title: Writer
Excerpt 1 (Australia):
from "The Great Barrier Reef: An Underwater Wonder"
This breathtaking natural wonder is made up of thousands of individual reef systems and coral cays and hundreds of tropical islands that are home to the world’s most beautiful beaches. No wonder it’s such a popular place to visit. Of course, the chance to swim in warm island waters on sun soaked beaches or view a breathtaking array of marine species doesn’t hurt its popularity, either.
Most people know about the colourful coral that make up the reef – but did you know that the reef is so large it can be seen from outer space? The reef stretches an astounding 2300 kilometres. That’s bigger than Victoria and Tasmania combined, or roughly the same size as the entire country of Japan!
Excerpt 2 (Australia):
from "Ceiling Fans and Air Flow"
Whether you are looking to save money, save the environment, or simply get some relief from an oppressively hot Australian summer, a ceiling fan is your answer. Ceiling fans are not only decorative alternatives to a plain-looking ceiling light, they are an increasingly popular home energy efficiency feature. Did you know that ceiling fans can reduce your electricity bill in both the summer and winter months? Fans can work with your air conditioning unit or open windows in the summer and with heat ducts or radiators in the winter to decrease your energy bills and your dependence on air conditioning and heat. By installing and running a ceiling fan, air can be pushed down or drawn up, cooling or heating whichever room you choose.

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E. Topinka

E. Topinka

marketing, news reporting, travel, sports, literature, parenting, cooking, home and DIY

E. Moller

media, translation, telecom industry, education and training, health and medicine, travel

Education: some pre-med; B.A. French, Italian and English
Professional Experience:

  • Media
  • Translation
  • Telecom industry
  • Education

Can also write on:

  • Health and medicine
  • Crafts and hobbies
  • Music
  • Kids and family
  • Travel

Languages: English, French, Italian
Posts: dozens
Has lived in: The UK, France
Title: Writer
Excerpt 1 (technical - X market):
from "What Does it Mean To Say Something’s “Fair Trade?”"

Shopping these days is not just about checking prices and quality; there are more and more labels on our food and clothes, telling us where they’re from, what’s in them and how good or bad they are for us. One label you’re probably seeing a lot more often is the eye-catching fair trade symbol. For the ethical consumer, it’s absolutely vital, but how much do you know about the work that goes on behind it?

You might know that when you buy fair trade coffee, the farmer has been paid a fair price for it, but did you know that it’s also about making sure that the workers have safe working conditions, that no child has been exploited in the production of the beans that make your daily espresso and that no-one should have suffered discrimination in the process? One of the key benefits for poor producers in developing countries is that fair trade is also about developing long-term contracts, so that income and work are guaranteed.

Excerpt 2 (general- X market):
from "Ageing and Your Changing Lighting Needs"
Lots of things change as we get older, and the way our eyes work is no exception. Lights which were perfectly suitable for reading ten years ago might not be bright enough now. When you’re preparing a meal in your kitchen, you might find yourself thinking, ‘I need to get some brighter light globes’. This is because parts of our eyes, like the retina and nucleus, start to degenerate a little as we age. In addition, our pupils get smaller as we get older, so less light reaches the back of the eye. Research shows that older people need as much as three times more light than younger people in order to see well

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E. Moller

E. Moller

media, translation, telecom industry, education and training, health and medicine, travel

J. Mullins

business, marketing, poverty and social issues, disability and health, kids and family

Education: B.S. in Environmental Science, with minor in geology (3/4 complete)
Professional Experience:

  • Published article - HuffingtonPost.com
  • Graphic designer- Local newspaper

Can also write on:

  • Environmental science and geology
  • Business
  • Marketing
  • Poverty and social issues
  • Disability and health
  • Kids and family

Posts: dozens
Has lived in: The US - Texas and Michigan
Title: Writer
Excerpt 1 (Australia):
from "Creatures You Might See on Johanna Beach"
The border where the land meets the sea is full of both kinds of life. Even if at first glance the beach seems empty of wildlife, patience and a closer look will likely reward you with sightings of some of the many amazing coastal animals that call Johanna Beach home. Plovers and oyster catchers run on the sand below, while overhead you might see a majestic white-bellied sea eagle soaring above the cliffs. The steep cliff faces, sand dunes and sea rocks house many animals that journey in and out of the water for food. You can often see several varieties of seals dozing on the rocks in the sunshine. Surf fishing might also give you a glance of what is under the cerulean waters of the Bass Straight, including salmon, pinkie snapper and sharks. If you're very lucky and the time of year is right, you may even see a pod of dolphins playing in the surf, or the whales that calve in these warm coastal waters. Though sightings are rare, they have been seen occasionally all the way from Apollo Bay to Portland. Seeing these creatures would be the crowning glory of a holiday full of Australian life.
Excerpt 2 (Australia):
from "Drive home your message"
Good design communicates a company's quality, professionalism, and credibility. If an ad looks professional, potential customers are more likely to trust that your business can deliver. Certain design elements can also convey what your business represents. Are you selling luxurious spa lotions to make your customers feel pampered? Then you might use the colours of sea and earth, and text and graphics that speak to a more high end crowd. Perhaps your business is a local pizza takeaway, catering to busy, hungry people. In that case, you might use primary colours and bold, dark lettering to get your customers’ attention. Whatever your business and whatever your message, you want to make sure you attract your target audience and make them remember you. The best way of doing that is with the right graphic design on your leaflets and flyers. Our professional designers here at (client) have the experience and marketing knowledge to create the right design for you.

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J. Mullins

J. Mullins

business, marketing, poverty and social issues, disability and health, kids and family